MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION OF THE UNITED STATES

Loyal Legion Vignettes


LIEUTENANT COLONEL CURWEN BOYD MCLELLAN, 1ST U.S. CAVALRY
(1829 Scotland - 1898 Missouri)
Insignia Number 10051, Original Member of the Missouri Commandery
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

By
by Douglas Niermeyer, Past Commander-in-Chief
and Mitchell Grant Davenport, Associate Companion
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States
momollus@sbcglobal.net
(October 2006)



General Alfred Pleasonton and Staff
Warrenton, Virginia, October 1863

Photograph Courtesy of CivilWar Photos.net

Standing: 1. Lt. Ira W. Trask, 8th Illinois Cavalry; 2. Lt. George W. Yates, 4th Michigan Infantry; 3. Lt. James F. Wade, 6th U.S. Cavalry; 4. Lt. Henry Baker, 5th U.S. Cavalry; 5. Lt. Leicester Walker, 5th U.S. Cavalry; 6. Capt. Charles C. Suydam, Assitant Adjutant General; 7. Lt. Daniel W. Littlefield, 7th Michigan Cavalry; 8. Unknown; 9. Lt. Curwen B. McLellan, 6th U.S. Cavalry; 10. Unknown; and 11. Lt. G. Irvine Whitehead, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Seated: 1. Lt. Col. Albert S. Austin, Chief Commissary; 2. Col. George A. H. Blake, 1st U.S. Cavalry; 3. General Pleasonton; 4. Lt. Col. Charles R. Smith, 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry and Chief of Staff; and 5. Capt. Henry B. Hays, 6th U.S. Cavalry and Ordnance Officer.

On Ground: 1. Lt. Woodbury M. Taylor, 8th Illinois Cavalry; 2. Capt. Enos B. Parsons, 8th New York Cavalry; 3. Capt. Frederick C. Newhall; 6th Pennsylvania Cavlary; 4. Lt. Clifford Thomson, 1st New York Cavalry; 5. Surgeon S. L. Pancoast, U.S.Volunteers; and 6. Lt. B. T. Hutchins, 6th U.S. Cavalry.

Curwen Boyd McLellan was born April 7, 1829 at Merton Hall, Wigtonshire, Scotland, the son of James and Mary (Pollock) McClelland. In 1760, William Boyd was presented by the Earl of Galloway to the parish of Penningham, Wigtonshire, where he officiated untill he died, circa 1795. This reverend gentleman possessed considerable property in Glasgow, by inheritance, and purchased the small estate of Merton Hall, near Newton-Stewart, on which is a fine mansion, still in the ownership of his descendants.

Curwen Boyd McLellan had immigrated to the United States by 1849. His military career spanned nearly 44 years. Prior to the Civil War, Curwen saw service in California, New Mexico, and Texas. Later, he saw service during the Civil War in Army of the Potomac and afterwards on the frontier.

He joined the U.S. Army on November 17, 1849 intially serving in Company B of the 3rd U.S. Infantry as a Private, Corporal, Sergeant, and 1st Sergeant. He then transfered to Company A of the 1st U.S. Dragoons. From August 7, 1854 to June 11, 1861, he served in Company H of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry as a Private and Sergeant. On May 14, 1861, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd U.S. Cavalry. He transferred to the 6th U.S. Cavalry on August 3, 1861, where he served as Regimental Adjutant from October 1, 1861 through November 30, 1861. He was made a Brevet 1st Lieutenant on May 5, 1862 for gallant and meritous service in the Battle of Williamsburg, Virginia, and the promoted to 1st Lieutenant on July 17, 1862. He was made a Brevet Captain on July 3, 1863 for gallant and meritous service in the Gettysburg Campaign, and a Brevet Major on March 31, 1865 for gallant and meritous service in the Battle of Dinwiddie, Virginia. He was promoted to Captain on July 28, 1866 and Major of the 10th US Cavalry on December 30, 1881. He was made a Brevet Lieutenant Colonel on February 27, 1890 for gallant service in the actions against the Indians near Red River Indian Territory and in the San Andreas mountains of New Mexico on April 7, 1880. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the 3rd U.S. Cavalry on May 6, 1892. He transferred to the 1st U.S. Cavalry on May 26, 1892 and retired April 7, 1893.

Curwen Boyd McLellan was elected an original Companion of the Missouri Commandery of Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States on October 30, 1893 (Insignia No.10051). He died August 24, 1898 in St. Louis, Missouri and was buried at the Arlington National Cemetery next to his third wife, Margaret, in Section 6, Site Lot-8506. His marker lists his death date as August 21, 1898 but multiple sources state that it was actually August 24.


Curwen Boyd McLellan's Grave Marker
Photograph Courtesy of Mitchell Grant Davenport

Margareth B. (Kelso) McLellan's Grave Marker
Photograph Courtesy of Mitchell Grant Davenport

Curwen was first married to Susan Carmack who died in 1869 without issue. Curwen married second to Alice Gilbert (born in Maryland and died 1879 in Arizona) and they had three children:

1) Alice Maude McLellan, who was born in 1873 in Kansas and died by 1898;

2) Curwen Gilbert McLellan, who was born December 2, 1874 at Ft. Dodge, Kansas [He served as a Private in Company G of the 1st U.S. Infantry. He was seen in 1900 living in the Pinar del Rio Barracks in Cuba (listed residence as 9210 Page Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri), in 1910 at the Chouteau Indian Reservation, Montana, and was last seen in 1920 in Massillon, Stark County, Ohio (Perry Township on East Charles Street with the Howard B. Getz family)]; and

3) Mabel C. McLellan, who was born September 1879 in Arizona [She was last seen living with her step-mother in Central Townhship, St. Louis County, Missouri in 1900].

Curwen married a third time to Margareth B. Kelso (born October 1860). She applied for widow's pension October 31, 1898 in Missouri (Application No. 685.547, Certificate No. 483.382). In 1900, she was living in Central Township, St. Louis County, Missouri with her mother, Margareth Kelso (born October 1827 Kentucky), and in 1920 at the Fort Myer's Military Reservation in Alexandria County, Virginia. They had two children:

4) Margareth McLellan, who was born November 1894 in Missouri [She was last seen living with her mother in Central Township, St. Louis County, Missouri in 1900]; and

5) Donald Boyd McLellan, who died by 1898.

The following marker inscription is in honor of Curwen McLellan and the 6th U.S. Cavalry:

Fort Tour Archer County, Texas Historical Markers
(Marker Location: from Archer City, take FM 25 North about 2 miles to roadside park)

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Descendants of Lieutenant Colonel Curwen Boyd McLellan and descendants of his siblings are eligible for hereditary membership in the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS - founded by Civil War officers on April 15, 1865) and the Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States (founded in 1899 as the auxiliary to the MOLLUS). For more information on either or both organizations, please visit each organization's national website:


Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States


Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States

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Visit the Homepage of the
Missouri Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

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Sources:
1) Membership Records of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United State.
2) Missouri Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United State, Circular No. 183, February 4, 1899.
3) Portrait of General Alfred Pleasonton, Officer of the Federal Army, and Staff - Warrenton, Virginia, October 1863 (see http://www.civilwarphotos.net/files/images/289.jpg)
4) Fort Tour Archer County, Texas Historical Markers, Marker Title: Battle of the Little Wichita (see http://www.forttours.com/pages/hmarcher.asp)
5) Merton Hall, Wigtonshire, Scotland owned by the Boyd family (see http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/smihou/smihou090.htm)
6) Obiturary of Curwen Boyd McLellan, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, August 24, 1898

Copyright © 2006 Douglas Niermeyer, Missouri Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

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